Author: NLM Correspondent

📢 Got a Story That Needs Coverage? Let Nairobi Law Monthly be your platform! Whether it's breaking news or an in-depth feature, we're here to amplify your voice. 📧 Email Us: editor@nairobilawmonthly.com ✨ Advertising Opportunities Available! Promote your brand to our engaged audience. Contact us today to discuss advertising options. 📞 Call Anytime: +254715061658 Don't miss out on the chance to reach a wider audience and make an impact. Get in touch with Nairobi Law Monthly now!

Edwin Musonye Diaspora remittances are an essential financial input in many developing countries.  Kenya in particular, greatly values the conception. Processes are thus in place to capture data of the inflows. In further backing, national efforts supporting citizens to go work abroad are evident. This determination is popular because it seems to solve two shortcomings in a single blow. One is unemployment, which remains is at a high of 40 per cent – which is eased when job seekers find placement abroad – and, two , and perhaps more importantly, bonus funds, which are obtained and pumped into the ever…

Read More

NLM Writer Just three months after he was sworn into office for his first term, President Uhuru Kenyatta appointed a task force whose principal recommendation was the merger of State agencies. It was among the first policy initiatives by President Kenyatta after his election in March 2013. Membership of the Presidential Taskforce on Parastatal Reforms (PTPR) was drawn from both the public and private sector with Senior Advisor on Constitutional and Legislative Affairs in the Office of the President, Abdikadir Mohamed, and Group Managing Director Commercial Bank of Africa, Isaac Awuondo, as co-chairs. Other members of the task force include…

Read More

“A FOOL’S bargain.” That is how Idriss Déby, Chad’s president, now describes the state oil company’s decision to borrow $1.4bn (Sh140 billion) from Glencore, an Anglo- Swiss commodities trader, in 2014. The loan was to be repaid with future sales of crude, then trading above $100 (Sh10,000) a barrel. But two years later, as the price dived, debt payments were swallowing 85% of Chad’s dwindling oil revenue. For weeks schools have been closed and hospitals paralysed, as workers strike against austerity. On February 21st, after fractious talks, Chad and Glencore agreed to restructure the deal. Chad’s woes recall an earlier…

Read More

“We feel so hungry,” says Agatha Khasiala, a Kenyan housekeeper, grumbling about the price of meat and fish. She has recently moved in with her daughter because “the cost of everything is very high”. The data back her up. The World Bank publishes rough estimates of price levels in different countries, showing how far a dollar would stretch if converted into local currency. On this measure, Kenya is more expensive than Poland. This is surprising. The cost of living is generally higher in richer places, a phenomenon best explained by the economists Bela Balassa and Paul Samuelson. They distinguished between…

Read More

With their meeting last month, Kenya’s political arch rivals have been hailed for calming ethnic tensions in East Africa’s most vibrant democracy and ending a month-long stalemate that had brought the region’s biggest economy to a near halt. But Benna Buluma, 48, just feels that she has been left further behind. Her son Victor Okoth was killed by the police the day after Kenya’s presidential election in August — a vote whose contested result pushed the country to the brink of a democratic crisis and set off protests and violence that human rights groups said led to roughly 70 deaths at the…

Read More

The potential for conflicts related to large-scale land acquisitions could be cut down significantly if seven key pieces of information are included in every property transaction, land professionals say. The International Land Measurement Standards (ILMS) are the first global benchmark for classifying, defining, measuring and reporting land information with the goal to improve tenure security and enable fair compensation. Large-scale land acquisitions can spark conflict because of their potential to drive local people from their land and homes, with research published last year showing displacement of local people was the most significant driver of investment disputes in Africa. The new…

Read More

The expected rise in US interest rates will increase financial pressures on developing countries already struggling with a 60% jump in their debt repayments since 2014, a leading charity has warned. The Jubilee Debt Campaign said a study of 126 developing nations showed that they were devoting more than 10% of their revenues on average to paying the interest on money borrowed – the highest level since before the G7 agreement to write off the debts of the world’s poorest nations at Gleneagles, Scotland, in 2005. Five of the countries on the charity’s list – Angola, Lebanon, Ghana, Chad and Bhutan –…

Read More

In Kakuma, the barren plains of sand and stone have always known lean times: times when the rivers run dry and the cows wither day by day, until their bones are scattered under the acacia trees. But the lean times have always been followed by normal times, when it rains enough to rebuild herds, repay debts, give milk to the children and eat meat a few times each week. Times are changing, though. Northern Kenya — like its arid neighbours in the Horn of Africa — has become measurably drier and hotter, and scientists are finding the fingerprints of global…

Read More

By Kibe Mungai High Court Judge Joseph Louis Omondi Onguto, who died on February 28, 2018, was an accomplished legal practitioner, budding scholar, first-rate jurist and one of the most promising of the recently appointed judges. His death was both sudden and surprising both because he was only 53 years old; he died after a training session at Parklands Sports Club Nairobi in circumstances that belied his long-term dedication to wellness of body and that of the mind. By all yardsticks, Justice Onguto, who was appointed as a judge in July, 2014, leaves a rich legacy of diverse, sound, incisive…

Read More

Kenyatta Otieno In March 2008, at the height of uncertainties brought about by post-election violence, I found myself in Eldoret. I had just lost my job, which somehow did not bother me, and then my church asked for volunteers to go on a prayer and humanitarian trip organised by churches across the country. We went down to Mombasa then drove back to Nairobi, Naivasha, Nakuru, Eldoret and lastly down to Kisumu. The Nakuru and Eldoret sections of the trip have stuck with me to date. Even the Christ in us may not have withstood the weight of the stories we…

Read More